Where are your thoughts? On the relationship between technology use and mind wandering

Frederike Marie Oschinsky, Michael Klesel, Nina Ressel, Bjoern Niehaves

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionAcademicpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mind wandering is an important brain activity that fosters creativity and productivity. Research suggests that individuals spend up to 50% of their waking time thinking about things that are unrelated to the present situation or task. Previous literature has acknowledged the importance of mind wandering in technology-related contexts by investigating its mediating role between task and individual performance. In this study, we go one step further and investigate the direct relationship between technology use and mind wandering. In particular, we investigate if different types of technology use (hedonic use vs. utilitarian use) have an impact on mind wandering. Results from a factorial survey study (n=90) suggest that there is a significant difference between hedonic use and utilitarian use when it comes to mind wandering. Based on these insights, we discuss the role of mind wandering for IS research and potentials for future research.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 52nd Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2019
EditorsTung X. Bui
PublisherIEEE
Pages6709-6718
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9780998133126
Publication statusPublished - 2019
Event52nd Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2019 - Maui, United States
Duration: 8 Jan 201911 Jan 2019
Conference number: 52

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
Volume2019-January
ISSN (Print)1530-1605

Conference

Conference52nd Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2019
Abbreviated titleHICSS 2019
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityMaui
Period8/01/1911/01/19

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