Where have All the Scientists Gone? Building Research Profiles at Dutch Universities and its Consequences for Research

Grit Laudel, Elke Weyer

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademicpeer-review

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This article investigates the links between universities’ opportunities to shape their research profiles, the changing state interest concerning these profiles, and the impact of profile building on research at university and field levels. While the authority of the Dutch state over research profiles of Dutch universities has increased, university management has considerable operational authority over the inclusion of new research fields and removal of existing research fields. Since all universities have begun to follow the same external signals prescribing applied research, research that has easy access to external funding, and research in fields prioritised by the state, a ‘quasi-market failure’ may emerge, as is demonstrated for evolutionary developmental biology and Bose-Einstein condensation.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationOrganizational Transformation and Scientific Change: The Impact of Institutional Restructuring on Universities and Intellectual Innovation
    EditorsRichard Whitley, Jochen Gläser
    PublisherEmerald
    Pages111-140
    ISBN (Print)978-1-78350-684-2
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

    Publication series

    NameResearch in the Sociology of Organizations
    PublisherEmerald
    Number42

    Keywords

    • IR-91627
    • METIS-304820

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  • Cite this

    Laudel, G., & Weyer, E. (2014). Where have All the Scientists Gone? Building Research Profiles at Dutch Universities and its Consequences for Research. In R. Whitley, & J. Gläser (Eds.), Organizational Transformation and Scientific Change: The Impact of Institutional Restructuring on Universities and Intellectual Innovation (pp. 111-140). (Research in the Sociology of Organizations; No. 42). Emerald.