Whose side are you on? Relational orientations and their impacts on side-taking among Dutch and Chinese employees

H. Yang, Evert van de Vliert, Kan Shi, Xu Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Informal relationships often influence employees who intervene in an interpersonal conflict between colleagues. We investigate and report the effects of relational orientations (reciprocity orientation and communal orientation) on employee preference of choosing sides between an acquaintance and a friend in a workplace dispute in The Netherlands and China. A scenario study was conducted among 104 Dutch and 105 Chinese employees. As hypothesized, the results indicate that employees, especially Dutch employees, with an interest-concerned reciprocity orientation tend to side with the acquaintance who has a greater potential to return the favour. By contrast, employees, especially Chinese, with a sharing-concerned communal orientation tend to side with their workplace friend. Explanations and implications of the findings are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)713-731
JournalJournal of occupational and organizational psychology
Volume81
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Fingerprint

Workplace
Dissent and Disputes
Netherlands
China
Employees
Work place
Conflict (Psychology)
Scenarios
Dispute
The Netherlands

Keywords

  • METIS-242930
  • IR-67235

Cite this

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Whose side are you on? Relational orientations and their impacts on side-taking among Dutch and Chinese employees. / Yang, H.; van de Vliert, Evert; Shi, Kan; Huang, Xu.

In: Journal of occupational and organizational psychology, Vol. 81, No. 4, 2008, p. 713-731.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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